Exhibitions

Current and Past Exhibitions

Short St Gallery presents Mionomehi Oriseegé (Ancestral Paths). The exhibition is a showcase of the incredible artwork from the Oro Province of Papua New Guinea. It is a celebration of the nioge (barkcloth), an art form practiced exclusively by the Omie women. Nioge are produced entirely by hand; from the stripping of the bark, the transformation of the bark into cloth, to the creation of the natural pigments that the artists use in their intuitive and graphic designs. The bark cloths are painstakingly produced and carried back from one of the most remote areas in the world. They are truly a labour of love and a thing of ephemeral beauty. The exhibition takes the viewer on a journey as the Omie artists honour their ancestral paths utilising the dynamic iconography that is their living art and culture.
In 1957 as a small child Helicopter Tjungarrayi left the desert for the first time in a mining helicopter at the behest of his brother because he was very sick. His story is now an important part of Australia's story and informing an element of the National Gallery of Australia's collection. It has also become a well known part of Kimberley folk lore. The story is the foundation of his name and his journey was the impetus for his community to make the trek to Balgo. Helicopter still lives there today and has been an advocate and painter since the 1990's. Helicopter's continued art practice and commitment to reinterpreting his traditional country on canvas has turned him into the senior artist he is today. His artwork is typically the fire colours of the desert, tracking the sand hills and waterholes that are so important to desert living. Helicopter's paintings and story have a resonance, strength and longevity that speak of his pride in country, men's law, his place as a marpan man (healer) and as an important senior artist. Short St Gallery is proud through our long association with Helicopter to present this solo exhibition which commemorates his work over the years and his place as an important Australian artist. The exhibition opens July 21 at 6pm, Helicopter will be in attendance to celebrate. All are welcome.
Short St Gallery presents GOOD TOGETHER in conjunction with artists from the communities of Kanpi, Nyapari and Watarru in the APY Lands in South Australia. These stunning artworks show the beauty and power of the artists' country as they explore the landscape that is their home. The Tjungu Palya artists work together to grow and inspire their community through their art practice. This survey exhibition seeks to showcase this inspiration and collective meaning, featuring highly collectable pieces from renowned artists and two impressive group works from the Watarru collaborative.
In Pitjantajara language the word Ngura is multifaceted, taking in the geography of land and country as well as being a place that someone belongs. Ngura defines an individual, their family, connections, skin groups and language. Short St Gallery has sought to provide an exhibition that covers the full gamut of what Ngura (country) means to the artists of Iwantja. For the ten artists showcased here, country can be soft and deep while for others it is intricate and sweeping. The rich textures of this exhibition will be available to view in the gallery from May 26th.
Gimme Shelter is an incredible survey from the artists of Fitzroy Valley. The exhibition showcases work from Mangkaja studio across the generations and styles. It glides from the strong, tight and often figurative works of senior men such as Mervyn Street and Tommy May, through to the soft fluid works depicting country and seasons from the likes of Nada Rawlins and Dolly Snell. There is a strong Sonia Kurarra presence showcasing her country Martuwarra with her magnificent mark making. The exhibition is a celebration of freshwater country. Please join us for the opening from 6pm April 28th.
A survey exhibition from the Artists from Amata in the APY lands. This exhibition focuses on the artists of Amata in the APY Lands. Tjala Arts is known for its diverse range of styles, energetic mark making and rich colourful palette. Artists explore Tjukurpa ( stories, dreaming) of the region and create paintings which are filled with artistic integrity that immediately captivate their audience. Incredible works are presented by the following artists, Barbara Mbitjana Moore, Ray Ken, Sylvia Ken, Tjimpayi Presley, Jennifer Ingkatji, Wawiriya Burton,Tjungkara Ken, Maringka Tunkin, Freda Brady and Sandra Ken
An exhibition focusing on the monumental women's story of the Seven Sisters by Sylvia Ken. This is a Tjukurpa Story (Creation Story) about the constellations of Pleiades and Orion. The sisters are the constellaton of Pleiades and the other star Orion is said to be Nyiru or Nyirunya (described as a lusty or bad man). Nyiru is forever chasing the sisters known as the Kunkarunkara women as it is said he wants to marry the eldest sister.The seven sisters travel again and again from the sky to the earth to escape Nyiru’s unwanted attentions. They turn into their human form to escape from the persistent Nyiru, but he always finds them and they flee back to the sky. As Nyiru is chasing the sisters he tries to catch them by using magic to turn into the most tempting kampurarpra (bush tomatoes) for the sisters to eat and the most beautiful Ili (fig) tree for them to camp under. However, the sisters are too clever for Nyiru and outwit him as they are knowledgeable about his magic. They go hungry and run through the night rather than be caught by Nyiru. Every now and again one of the women fall victim to his ways. It is said that he eventually captures the youngest sister, but with the help of the oldest sister, she escapes back to her sisters who are waiting for her. Eventually the sisters fly back into the sky to escape Nyiru, reforming the constellation. (In some cases the artist will secretly depict sexual elements as Nyiru is really only after one thing -sex).
This is a special exhibition featuring works by Daniel Walbidi. Daniel explores the great rainmaker Wirnpa story, who travelled extensively across the western desert to finally rest in a shared rain making jila in the Percival lakes in Western Australia. These works celebrate this ancestral being, and remind us all of the living nature of our country.
An exhibition by the Men of Jilamara, including Timothy Cook, Conrad Tipungwuti, Pedro Wonaeamirri, Brian Farmer illortamini, Linus Warlapinni, Raymond Bush, Nicholas Mario, Pius Tipungwuti, Patrick Freddy Puruntatameri and Matthew Freddy Puruntatameri. The show seeks to celebrate the importance of Men's law and its contribution to cultural practice. The carving is very physical work, and has a long history at Snake bay and it continues to be passed from one generation to the next. The painting traditions such as combing onto the canvas, made so famous by Pedro Wanaeamirri, also continues to be utilised and explored in new and exciting ways.
Short St Gallery is proud to bring to the coast these epic iconic desert paintings from the APY lands. This survey exhibition features works from; Tuppy Goodwin, Ngupulya Pumani, Kathleen Tjapalyi, Robert Fielding, Joanne Wintjin, Judy Martin, Marina Pumani, Betty Pumani, Mike Williams and Linda Puna. The wonderful diversity of these artists works from the remote community of Mimili in South Australia is self evident. Journey through the desert, exploring the intricate overlaying of Goodwin, to the graphic desert stuctures of Pumani (Betty) and the gestural painterly images of Puna, which are contrasted to the highly structured works of Fielding. This is a multi faceted experience of current desert painting.